Author Topic: Micro wires question  (Read 4538 times)

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Offline Kimbrey

Re: Micro wires question
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2015, 12:47:16 AM »
This thread reminds me why I hate NMEA 0183 connections.  I don't think there really is a "good" way to do them, short of soldering and heat shrinking them. 

Maybe we will see more radio and plotter makers moving to NMEA 2000 and rendering all of this obsolete.
It's interesting with the several electronic techs we use for repair & new equipment install almost all do not care for NMEA 2000.  I'm not sure why but they don't like it. 

Personally I think 183 can turn into a real mess as on the ship we route a lot of stuff through expanders and multiplexers.  NMEA 2000 seems easier but it can be a royal pain in the butt when one of the manufactures (Raymarine) wants to use their own proprietary connectors.  Such as trying to get route info out of my Raymarine plotter to my Garmin autopilot.  I forget where I finally found the jumper cable to go from one 2000 backbone to the other and then I had to cut into the jumper and clip one of the power conductors so I wouldn't have two sources of power feed.  Hmmm maybe 183 isn't all that bad...just a mess of wires.
2005 Sea Legend --Sold--replaced with 26' Duckworth

Offline DSCS

Re: Micro wires question
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2015, 06:58:08 AM »

Personally I think 183 can turn into a real mess as on the ship we route a lot of stuff through expanders and multiplexers.  NMEA 2000 seems easier but it can be a royal pain in the butt when one of the manufactures (Raymarine) wants to use their own proprietary connectors.  Such as trying to get route info out of my Raymarine plotter to my Garmin autopilot.  I forget where I finally found the jumper cable to go from one 2000 backbone to the other and then I had to cut into the jumper and clip one of the power conductors so I wouldn't have two sources of power feed.  Hmmm maybe 183 isn't all that bad...just a mess of wires.

I avoided all the proprietary connectors and multiple backbones by using field replaceable connectors. Just clip off whatever funky connector the mfg used and install a standard micro-C connector. Then just plug into the micro-C backbone. Thankfully they all use basically the same color code for the wires inside the NMEA 2000 cable. Simrad substitutes yellow for white and there may be other differences.

The mfgs are very proud of their adapter cables. That's what drove me to find the solution above. I have had Simrad, Garmin, and Raymarine all playing together nicely on the same micro-C network.

Alan
We're most of us liars, we're 'arf of us thieves,
an' the rest are as rank as can be,
But once in a while we can finish in style
(which I 'ope it won't 'appen to me).

Offline Threeweight

Re: Micro wires question
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2015, 11:27:26 AM »
I think the proprietary cables are a plot to get us to buy all of our electronics from a single brand.   :nono:
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson