Author Topic: What's a good kicker motor?  (Read 5244 times)

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Offline Threeweight

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #25 on: November 10, 2013, 12:01:05 PM »
Re: thermostats, the typical small outboard is designed to run at 3000-5000 RPM, moving a boat around on plane, in a warm-ish climate.  The thermostats installed in them are designed to keep the engine in its ideal operating temperature in those conditions.

Take that same motor and use it in a kicker application where it never revs above 1500 RPM for hours and hours on end, and operate it in waters that are never warmer than 50-55 degrees, and the engine never reaches its ideal operating temps. 

In 4 strokes used under these conditions, you can have a problem in the crank case with water vapor condensing out of the air and mixing with the oil.  In addition to the obvious lubrication problems, over time this will over-flow the crank case and can blow out seals in the motor.  This is not a problem in a motor that reaches its ideal operating temps, as the water will be cooked out out of the crankcase and vented through the PCV valve.

Most purpose-built kickers will have thermostats designed to deal with this by keeping the motor operating temps hot at  low RPMs.  On others you sometimes have to upgrade the thermostat (and sometimes go to hotter spark plugs to).  The Honda BF8A "classic"  needs these upgrades to work well as a kicker in cold Pacific Northwest waters.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline CoolBreeze

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2013, 12:21:36 PM »
Thank you 3wt! That is excellent information.

Do any of the modern kickers, f8, f9.9, t9.9, or Honda 8/9.9, Suzuki, etc, need these upgrades?

CB

Offline Threeweight

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2013, 12:39:25 PM »
I think any of the hi-thrust models marketed as kickers should be set up properly from the factory.  The only market for those motors is in colder climates like the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, Great Lakes, etc...

Many folks use the plain-jane small outboard as kickers with no problems as well.  Some have the problem with making oil, fouling plugs, etc...  Unfortunately, many associate the problem with brand X or Y, without looking into the mechanics of it.



Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Grizzle

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2013, 09:48:52 AM »
How about a Tohatsu sail pro 6?  Alternator, high thrust, inexpensive.

Can't recommend stuff I've never owned or used but I've been dying to experiment with somebody else's money on a sailpro 6. 

For that matter I'm also hoping someone will buy a Honda 60.
Brook Stockton - My Boat: Mighty Molly - The Fish Monger - Arima SeaChaser 16 - Soft SkipTower and "The Rack"

SALTBOSS™ MARINE - Offshore Marine Products & Fabrication - http://saltbossmarine.com - brook@saltbossmarine.com - 206-953-SALT (7258)

Online Kimbrey

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2013, 12:22:36 PM »
How about a Tohatsu sail pro 6?  Alternator, high thrust, inexpensive.

Can't recommend stuff I've never owned or used but I've been dying to experiment with somebody else's money on a sailpro 6. 

For that matter I'm also hoping someone will buy a Honda 60.
I thought Tohatsu made them all anyway.
2005 Sea Legend --Sold--replaced with 26' Duckworth

Offline Threeweight

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2013, 01:43:12 PM »
I have read Tohatsu makes their own motors, as well as the Nissans, and the power heads for the smaller (like 40 hp and under) 4 stroke Mercs.

Good reputation around the world, not popular here in the US (despite lots and lots of people running Mercs that are actually Tohatsu's, and not knowing it).

Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline DSCS

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2013, 03:40:49 PM »
I've run a Tohatsu 8 on my 17 for a season. Have a Tiny-Tac on it and I think it had around 175 hrs on it the last time I looked. Got the Tohatsu 'cause it was the lightest kicker I could find. Gained a bit of the weight back with electric start. It would have cost considerably more to buy the components for power generation and put them on myself than the price difference between manual and electric start.

I did swap out the original prop for a 4 blade/5 pitch. The original prop couldn't get the max revs up anywhere near the recommended range. With the 5 pitch I can run anywhere from 1 mph to 5.5 mph and max revs are right in the sweet spot.

The motor has been sweet. No complaints whatsoever.

Alan

Little side story: Last July up at Critter Cove there were three guys working on a Merc 9.9 on a boat across the dock. I asked if they wanted to borrow my service manual. The one guy saw my Tohatsu on the back and said "Oh, I didn't know Mercury made the Tohatsus". I told him they don't... Tohatsu makes the Mercs. Poor guy looked like I had just passed in his Wheaties!  :whistle: After a couple of hours they swallowed their pride and borrowed the manual.
We're most of us liars, we're 'arf of us thieves,
an' the rest are as rank as can be,
But once in a while we can finish in style
(which I 'ope it won't 'appen to me).

Offline blindmonkey

Re: What's a good kicker motor?
« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2013, 06:04:19 PM »
I'm surprised u didn't like the Honda.  I have had a few over the years and never been disappointed. As far as HP goes having to come home on a kicker more than once over the years I would definitely consider one that will handle current, tides and make headway. 
Lorne
2013 17' Sea Chaser, Honda 90, Yamaha F8
1994 Sea Explorer, Mercury 60, SOLD