Author Topic: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .  (Read 594 times)

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Offline wedocq

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #25 on: November 12, 2017, 01:44:08 PM »
After analyzing this video, he was definitely slow on the throttle. At .02 sec into the video, he really needed to be throttling up hard. He must have had a lot of weight in that bow with how low it was riding!
-Shawn
2002 21' Arima Sea Ranger HT  Suzuki DF175 4-stroke.
WEDOCQ= WE DO SEKIU! It pays homage to my Uncle Jay who died of cancer.

Offline Sparhawk

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #26 on: November 12, 2017, 10:20:21 PM »
After analyzing this video, he was definitely slow on the throttle. At .02 sec into the video, he really needed to be throttling up hard. He must have had a lot of weight in that bow with how low it was riding!
-Shawn
That’s a good thought about throttling up. That would help keep his bow from dipping into the water and going into a nosedive.
"God put me on this Earth to accomplish a certain number of things. Right now I am so far behind I will never die" - Calvin and Hobbes

1983 Tiderunner 150 Cuddy
70 Horsepower Evinrude

Offline seren

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2017, 11:50:12 AM »
I found a longer video from the person who recorded it.

The guy who recorded it said, "letting you know that he was Off-Throttle when the Following Wave pushed him into the next wave".

To me it looks like the boater was coming in to fast in following seas, and the swells piled up on him.
Maybe his boat was sinking, do to no plug in, and he was trying to get in the harbor?

https://www.instagram.com/p/Ba1j5TIHgNa/

I don't think he was coming too fast. It looks like he was following the wave in front of him. From the distance between his boat and the wave behind at the beginning of the video, it looks like he was running at the same speed of the waves at first. But then when he got to the mouth of the inlet, there seems to be swells that made the wave in front of him look to slow down. I guess
that was why he slowed down as well. I don't know if it's recommended to have someone one else to watch the wave behind the boat or not. But that seems to be as important. Good experience to learn. Don't let the wave behind the boat to catch up to you.

Offline Threeweight

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #28 on: November 14, 2017, 12:07:33 PM »
To me those look like standing waves, not swells.  Outgoing tide from a large bay/inlet passing over a shoal or sandbars at the constricted part of the inlet = standing waves kick up.

It looked to me like he came off throttle, then had a swell push him from behind into the standing wave in front and flood the boat.  In a bar crossing out here in the NW, we'd try and handle that situation just as Shawn described.... match speed with the swells, throttle down as you crest a wave, throttle up before you hit the trough to lift the bow up and climb the next one.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline AlexB

Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #29 on: November 14, 2017, 01:48:14 PM »
I agree that looks like groundswell (or windswell...) from offshore meeting up with a group of standing waves at the inlet.

What’s your strategy for navigating through standing waves like that?

(For the sake of discussion, let’s assume that waiting for slack tide isn’t an option.)



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Offline seren

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #30 on: November 14, 2017, 02:35:40 PM »
.... match speed with the swells, throttle down as you crest a wave, throttle up before you hit the trough to lift the bow up and climb the next one.

If you ease on the throttle as you crest a wave, wouldn't the wave (or in your term the swell) behind you catch up to you? And when it does, it will lift your stern up and you may end up like the guy in the video. The wave behind you will not slow down no matter what is in front of you.

Offline Threeweight

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2017, 03:07:21 PM »
If you stay off throttle for too long, yes you will get caught.  That's what happened to this guy, IMO.  He throttled down just as his nose started hit the next wave, then the swell picked up the back end of the boat and accelerated it into the wave, burying the nose.

I try to have a guy watch behind the boat to tell me if they see anything building that may break when I am coming in across a bar.  Match speed as best you can with incoming swells, and try to ride the backside of them.  If one looks like it is going to break, you want to throttle up and get out of its way (either by outrunning it or quartering away from it at speed).

These standing waves make things MUCH harder, and that is why I would never cross in those conditions unless it was a matter of life and death.  If you have to cross in those conditions, all you can do is match swell speed, and constantly be jockeying the throttle.  Power up to lift the bow out of any troughs and avoid burying the nose, and to climb steep waves.  Come off throttle and pause for a few seconds while you crest the waves (so you don't launch into the air).  Be ready to come back on throttle as you near the trough, to maintain steerage and pick up the nose before it buries into the next wave.

Sometimes the standing waves are just too tightly spaced to allow for much maneuvering.  In that case, all you can do is slow down to just on plane (14-16 mph in my boat), trim the bow way up, and try to zig zag through them (taking them at 45 degree angles instead of head on), while you watch and gun it if a breaking swell starts to catch up.

Bar crossings suck, and in general, it is ALWAYS preferable to wait for a more favorable tide to cross on.  When the tide starts to flood in, those standing waves disappear and you just have the swell to contend with (and they will likely be much smaller without the outgoing tide push them up).  IMO, this guys biggest mistake was trying to cross on an ebb tide.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 03:12:51 PM by Threeweight »
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Markshoreline

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2017, 05:09:47 PM »
And make sure your trim tabs are UP.
2002 Sea Ranger HT 21, Yamaha 150, Yamaha 9.9

Online Dhil12

Re: Amazing how fast this boat sunk. .
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2017, 05:31:55 PM »
Watching this I see a few problems which others have said. The boat is loaded heavey in the bow and he cut his throttle in the trough, instead of staying riding the wave ahead of him. Also remember waves come in sets. If you are going in in a following sea try to find the calm water between sets and follow that in
Darrell
2018 Sea Legend ht with bulkhead
2018 Yamaha 200
9.9 yamaha kicker