Author Topic: About those sponsons...  (Read 1335 times)

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Offline Diablo

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2017, 09:51:36 AM »
What kills me is seeing guys in the summer on flat calm days trolling at almost 3 mph on their main and the kicker trimmed up along for the ride....thats a travesty

I usually figure they don’t do any maintenance and the kicker won’t start. :facepalm:
'98 19SR  '15 E Tec 115, '10 Honda 8
'88 17SR  '90 Johnson 90, Honda 8, SOLD

Offline J Chaser

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2017, 10:00:56 AM »
I am a stickler for maintenance. Sometimes I troll with my main because it's smooth and virtually silent. As opposed to my kicker.

John
Sea Chaser 1511, Yamaha F70, Yamaha F6 kicker

Offline Threeweight

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2017, 10:04:20 AM »
Single cylinder engines inherently have more rattle and vibration than twins.  Twins are heavier, but if you want smooth and quiet they are superior.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Threeweight

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #28 on: November 02, 2017, 10:06:30 AM »
If you do use your main for trolling and want to go slower you could switch to a lower pitch prop during salmon season then switch back to your normal prop.

When I see guys trolling on the Columbia on their mains, they are often dragging drift socks or 5 gallon plastic buckets to try and slow the speed down.

Coho here (and on the ocean) will take a fast troll.  Our spring chinook are notorious for preferring a very, very slow troll.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #29 on: November 02, 2017, 10:14:31 AM »
If you do use your main for trolling and want to go slower you could switch to a lower pitch prop during salmon season then switch back to your normal prop.

When I see guys trolling on the Columbia on their mains, they are often dragging drift socks or 5 gallon plastic buckets to try and slow the speed down.

Coho here (and on the ocean) will take a fast troll.  Our spring chinook are notorious for preferring a very, very slow troll.
Our chinook salmon prefer a very slow troll as well. My preferred troll speed is 1-1.8 mph
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Rokefin

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #30 on: November 02, 2017, 10:17:19 AM »
The louder vibrating kicker is one of the main reasons I use my main to troll, would love a newer twin, the main is smooth and quiet.
I just switched to the 4 blade so my trolling speeds are faster and I will need to rely on the kicker more often. Fishing only the ocean I have caught salmon at slow speeds and at higher speeds :shrug9:

I am normally trolling 2.2 - 3.0 mph
1989 17ft Arima Sea Chaser 2010 115 Yamaha 1995 9.9 Yamaha kicker - Bodega mostly

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #31 on: November 02, 2017, 10:27:14 AM »
If I’m trolling in the river I always try to troll against the tide. If you troll with a tide that’s already going let’s say 2mph, and your boat has to go another 2 mph to keep the action of your lure, your SOG is now 4 mph+
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline darci

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Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #32 on: November 02, 2017, 10:47:07 AM »
If you do use your main for trolling and want to go slower you could switch to a lower pitch prop during salmon season then switch back to your normal prop. Good time to grease the prop shaft as well. Of course your top end speed will suffer but you’ll get good hole shot and on plane faster with a heavy load. Just an option.

THIS !
 I had a 19 pitch, (that got flattened with the rope) tried the Michigan Wheel 17 pitch for a day...it was a better fit. Just learning to dock , the slower pitch was a very good thing. Then we settled on a 15 pitch and was very pleased and it trolled slow and made docking much more pleasant.

Now with the new E-tec the 17 pitch trolls @ 1.6 kts at 500 rpm (idle)  upstream of Chinook Landing on the Columbia and 3.2 kts downstream.
The 55 lb thrust Minn Kota can do 2.0 kts  (maximum) upstream or 5kts with the main up.
I will get the slowest available Evinrude prop just for the CR and check it before the Springers arrive.

BTW I think I have caught about 100% of my salmon trolling a zig zag that is basically ACROSS the current 
(in the channel ACROSS THE TIDE FLOW).

Offline Threeweight

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #33 on: November 02, 2017, 10:57:25 AM »
The Columbia is tidal all the way up to the Columbia Gorge.  We typically fish cut plug herring 95% of the time when trolling, and troll in the same direction as the tide.  Try to troll against it to slow down and your herring blows out quickly and won't spin.  Most success comes from having good bottom charts and knowing what kind of structure funnels fish at different stages of the tide/river flow, then trolling through those areas.

The river is often VERY crowded in productive areas.  You don't want to be "that guy" trolling in the opposite direction of everyone elses boat, fouling lines and pushing people off their intended troll route.



Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline darci

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Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2017, 11:04:26 AM »
The Columbia is tidal all the way up to the Columbia Gorge.  We typically fish cut plug herring 95% of the time when trolling, and troll in the same direction as the tide.  Try to troll against it to slow down and your herring blows out quickly and won't spin.  Most success comes from having good bottom charts and knowing what kind of structure funnels fish at different stages of the tide/river flow, then trolling through those areas.

The river is often VERY crowded in productive areas.  You don't want to be "that guy" trolling in the opposite direction of everyone elses boat, fouling lines and pushing people off their intended troll route.



Amen, brothers Amen !

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #35 on: November 02, 2017, 11:38:36 AM »
The lower end of the river here is also tidal. The productive areas here can look the same way with many boats trying to crowd the same small area trolling in all different directions. It’s quite kaotic and I’ve lost rigs getting pushed into the shallows. I don’t care for combat Fishing anymore so I’ll just go a very short distance away from the herd and still catch fish all by myself! 99% of the time we troll large spinners. On a slow tide trolling with the current is doable, but with a fast outgoing tide your boat speed becomes way to fast to keep the spinner blades turning. 4-5 mph +
« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 11:56:25 AM by Fisherdv »
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #36 on: November 02, 2017, 12:09:41 PM »
Another good time to troll with the main is when Fishing in a large group of boats all very close together with choppy water and wind. The kicker motor just doesn’t have the maneuverability and thrust in those conditions
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #37 on: November 02, 2017, 12:49:49 PM »
   I think Fisher's right!  If I were trolling around a crowd like that, you can bet your backside I'd be running on the main.  To be honest, I'd be running in the opposite direction as fast as possible.   BTW, do you suppose any of these guys realize there may actually be a fish market somewhere nearby?   :jester:

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #38 on: November 02, 2017, 12:59:22 PM »
Yat, you would be surprised what a grown man would do to catch a salmon!  :hoboy: I’ve seen guys fist fighting standing waist deep in water at a bank Fishing spot. Guys stealing people’s stringers of fish! They go nuts!!!
« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 02:05:16 PM by Fisherdv »
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #39 on: November 02, 2017, 01:23:51 PM »
   Did you say......."grown" man?  :jester:  You know what's funny?  Year's ago people would tell me how lucky I was to own a boat.  They felt one of the benefits being, I got fish for "free".  My response was always something like this:  Yeah,  why should I pay $3.99 a lb. at the store when I can own my own boat and get it for $45.00 a lb.?  :jester:

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #40 on: November 02, 2017, 01:38:52 PM »
Wild, king salmon here in the store goes about $19.99 a pound. I saw just last weekend halibut fillets in the grocery store going for $26.99 a pound! No joke!
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Threeweight

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2017, 02:09:53 PM »
The kicker motor just doesn’t have the maneuverability and thrust in those conditions

Hi-thrust Yamaha T9.9 or Honda 9.9 does just fine in those conditions.  Specifically designed for it, big fat 4 blade props with very steep pitch.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2017, 02:28:13 PM »
Is the Honda 9.9 multi-cylinder? Less vibration?
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline J Chaser

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2017, 03:14:43 PM »
Yes and yes. Pretty heavy.

I have a Yamaha F6 - 2 cylinder that is a few years old. They are now a single cylinder.

J
Sea Chaser 1511, Yamaha F70, Yamaha F6 kicker

Offline StreamFixer

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Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2017, 03:15:31 PM »
Yamaha T8 & T9.9 run two cylinders...  Virtually no vibration and can push my 19SC around 5 knots with the 4 blade prop.  I am sure the Suziuki 9 is about the same..

StreamFixer
'97 19SC w/ Salt Boss Top
'03 Yamaha 115 EFI
'05 Yamaha T8 Solas 4 blade prop

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Offline Threeweight

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #45 on: November 02, 2017, 03:35:13 PM »
It's been a while since I looked, but I believe the Honda BF 9.9 hi-thrust is 110#.

The Yamaha's have kicker-specific lower unit, geared for trolling/pushing big sailboats.  Honda/Suzuki use a hi-thrust prop on their 9.9's, but run the same gearing.  If one wanted to go lighter, you can always use a hi-thrust prop on a manual start Honda 8.  I have no problem controlling my tin can (24'7" from anchor pulpit to motor bracket, with a giant hardtop) with my 9.9 high thrust.

On my old Arima, I ran an older Honda BF8a "Classic" for a kicker.  Manual start/tilt and trim, and a lot noisier than a modern motor, but it only weighed 80# and trolled like a champ with a hi-thrust prop.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #46 on: November 02, 2017, 03:43:28 PM »
I wonder what’s the smallest Honda kicker with multiple cylinders? I would want the least vibration and smoother motor. I’ll have to research a bit. I also have to consider the weight seeing as I only have a 16 SC. I would want a Honda for no specific reason other than it matches my main.
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Threeweight

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #47 on: November 02, 2017, 03:48:36 PM »
The BF 8 is their smallest, anything smaller is a single cylinder.  Same with all the other manufacturers these days.

I went Honda on the new boat because it was more cost effective and the motors last forever.  Yamaha kickers are the cat's meow for ultimate speed control and smooth running.  Suzuki's line of fuel injected kickers are pretty sweet for avoiding the headaches that come with carbs.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 03:59:36 PM by Threeweight »
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #48 on: November 02, 2017, 03:51:26 PM »
Thx 3wt
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Fisherdv

Re: About those sponsons...
« Reply #49 on: November 03, 2017, 09:51:16 PM »
Looks like all the Honda kickers are carbureted. No EFI?


2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP