Author Topic: gps/sonar/fishfinder  (Read 325 times)

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Offline moose

gps/sonar/fishfinder
« on: October 17, 2017, 05:32:44 AM »
I just recently purchased a 2004 19ft sea ranger and I am shopping for a GPS/fish finder. Looking at getting a Garmin GPSMAP® 7607. I would really like some input from you guys as this is my first "sea" boat. Any preferences. User friendly is a plus since I will be using it with my father who is technologically illiterate.

Offline Rokefin

Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2017, 08:09:52 AM »
Congrats - that is a very nice boat.. I use a Garmin and find it pretty easy to use, I think you'll find most all Garmin users love them. Get as large of screen as you can, it just makes it more enjoyable...

Enjoy the boat.
1989 17ft Arima Sea Chaser 2010 115 Yamaha 1995 9.9 Yamaha kicker - Bodega mostly

Offline Croaker Stroker

Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2017, 09:28:55 AM »

Welcome to the group !!
1987 - 17' Sea Pacer - 2004 Evinrude 90 E-tec
15' Sea Sprinter - **SOLD**

"If a fish will, he will… if he won't, he won't… and that's about it… except… he may take this when he won't take that."

Offline StreamFixer

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Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2017, 09:50:58 AM »
I currently run RayMarine. Had a Garmin that went with the boat I sold..  watched other's operate their Lorance gear.  RayMarine has a slight technical edge on Garmin, however, I have not found it as easy to use.  Garmin is much more intuitive.  If my RayMarine died, I would definitely replace with Garmin.  Generally speaking I don't like Lorance -- just a personal quirk...

My recommendation, go with the Garmin you have described, especially if it is your first rig...  You will likely not be disappointed. 

StreamFixer
'97 19SC w/ Salt Boss Top
'03 Yamaha 115 EFI
'05 Yamaha T8 Solas 4 blade prop

"By the grace of God we travel upon the rivers and sea..
They, like He, are mightier than me."  Mike Jesperson aka 'Nalu'

Offline Diablo

Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2017, 11:55:54 AM »
The best advice I could give you is you get what you pay for. You will find models that seem to have all the features of a more expensive model for half the price. The way they save cost is less expensiv, less powerful processor. I’ve learned that the hard way. You are buying a computer.
I use both Raymarine and Lowrance, I have not used Garmin. I personally like the HMI (Human Machine Interface) of the Lowrance. It’s a personal thing, you get used to one system.
I agree, get the biggest screen you can afford for tha size of the boat. I have a 9” on my 19 and that is a good size for that size boat.
Touch screen is nice but can be hard to use when you are bouncing around, I like both touch and buttons. Sometimes it is easer to use the buttons.
Sonar is the most important part of the multifunction display for a fisherman. Get at least 500 watts RMS.
Sometimes you can get deals on systems that have been superseded with newer model.
Good luck on your search, we are happy to spend other peoples money on this site.
'98 19SR  '15 E Tec 115, '10 Honda 8
'88 17SR  '90 Johnson 90, Honda 8, SOLD

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2017, 05:45:45 AM »
    My opinion is pretty much in line with Fixers.  I'm running a Raymarine A70D.  High quality and very dependable, but (as Fixer and others have suggested) requires a bit more effort with respect to the learning curve.  The operator manual is quite extensive, but (at times) can be a little overwhelming.  I actually had to go on line to get some advice on how to add data.  Then again, that just might be stupid me. :doh:    BTW, I also agree with Diablo........get the biggest screen you can afford, or have the space for. 

Have fun, Yat
Dear Arima:  Stretch the Hunter platform by 5. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline StreamFixer

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Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2017, 10:38:42 AM »
Like Yat, I went on line to get some questions asked.  Instructions from factory sponsored web site were very clear -- I printed and headed for the boat.  At about step 5, the next screen on the machine showed nothing like what the printed instructions indicated.

New, out of the box, I discovered I was on OS 8, while instructions were for OS 12.  I loaded V-12 and every thing worked fine, but the next year, another version...  I kept up to V-14 then stopped.  All the new stuff was oriented towards sail boats.  The FF and nav stuff that I needed was not changing.

I am beginning to think about radar (current equipment will handle it), but need to upgrade the trailer for more weight first.  Existing trailer slightly overloaded.

StreamFixer
'97 19SC w/ Salt Boss Top
'03 Yamaha 115 EFI
'05 Yamaha T8 Solas 4 blade prop

"By the grace of God we travel upon the rivers and sea..
They, like He, are mightier than me."  Mike Jesperson aka 'Nalu'

Offline Threeweight

Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2017, 12:09:37 PM »
Better to think about modern sonar/plotter combos as pieces of computer equipment for the boat, rather than a simple add on like a crab pot puller or a heater.  It's kind of like buying a new smart phone.

Cheaper units will be obsolete/outdated faster, and the build quality tends to be less robust.  All units will need software updates to address bugs/improve speed and performance over time.  Some makers specialize in ease of use, some in highest performance, some on most features at lowest price.

I like Garmin's simplicity and ease of use.  I have had Lowrance HDS products and they worked fine and held up well.  I personally prefer Raymarine, but their higher end units do have more customization features/options that can make them tougher for non-techy folks to use.  Furuno is the least user friendly of the bunch, but inversely makes the most robust equipment and hands down the most advanced/powerful sonars.

Best advice is go to West Marine or Rodgers Marine (if you are in Portland) and play with different units, and see what works for you.

Russ, I have the Raymarine RD418D "high definition" radar on the tin can... I like it a lot, but if I had to do it over again I'd go with their newer Quantum solid state "CHIRP" radar.  Less range, but draws much less power and produces much more detailed imagery, for about the same price.  Also less of a microwave hazard for tall people.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline BestBoats

Re: gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2017, 07:57:41 PM »
Congrats - that is a very nice boat.. I use a Garmin and find it pretty easy to use, I think you'll find most all Garmin users love them. Get as large of screen as you can, it just makes it more enjoyable...

Enjoy the boat.
X2! If your dad is older he will be able to see a bigger screen a lot better and it's easier to use. Go as big as you can afford!
2007 21' Sea Ranger Hardtop "THE A-TEAM"
150 Evinrude Etec
9.9 Susuki EFI

Offline Markshoreline

gps/sonar/fishfinder
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2017, 08:52:45 PM »
I have a Garmin 741xs, a b150h through hull 1k chirp transducer and an 18xd radar.  Everything is plug and play and the menu style touchscreen is easy to use in rough water.  The radar is excellent, the fish finder highly detailed and I don’t need a reference manual to use it.  I’ve heard that some of the other brands have superior electronics but I have to be able to get info quickly and without frustration.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 08:59:20 PM by Markshoreline »
2002 Sea Ranger HT 21, Yamaha 150, Yamaha 9.9