Author Topic: Flushing motors  (Read 921 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dhil12

Flushing motors
« on: October 04, 2017, 05:05:39 PM »
I went down today and flushed my motors using the water port, since I'm moored. I ran Saltaway for a minute in each with them lifted out of the water. Is that correct? I had water coming out every orifice including the tell tale.

Thanks,
Darrell
Darrell
2018 Sea Legend ht with bulkhead
2018 Yamaha 200
9.9 yamaha kicker

Offline Nineball

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2017, 05:23:51 PM »
Wait,  you ran the motors with them tilted up full?   No Bueno if that is correct....my etec might not mind it but any 4 stroke would be gasping for proper oil level.
SC17, 75etec, T9.9

Online Threeweight

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2017, 05:26:22 PM »
I assume he means he put Salt-Away through them using the flush port.

That is how I do it, minus the Salt-Away.  I save that for the driveway.  Phosphates that make that stuff fizzy and bubbly are fertilizer for algae and other assorted nastiness that grows in the marina (and one the boat).  When in the marina I just run freshwater, and let it run for 10 minutes.  I try to do this when the engine is still hot, before I wash anything else down at the dock.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Croaker Stroker

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2017, 06:24:39 PM »


Each motor is different, buy my last two outboard owner’s manuals have said not to run the motor while flushing with the flushing port.
1987 - 17' Sea Pacer - 2004 Evinrude 90 E-tec
15' Sea Sprinter - **SOLD**

"If a fish will, he will… if he won't, he won't… and that's about it… except… he may take this when he won't take that."

Offline Nineball

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2017, 06:49:57 PM »
Got it!  Sorry,  i kneejerked and almost dismantled your thread OP.  Carry on...
SC17, 75etec, T9.9

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2017, 07:01:58 PM »
   The big question with using the flushing port is whether or not water is getting into the pump in order to adequately rinse things out in that area.   I don't know for sure, but judging by the amount of water I see flowing out of the pickup ports, I'd say it is.  What I do is let the water run for about 5 minutes, then start the motor for about three seconds, after which, I continue flushing for a few more minutes.  Somehow I feel spinning that pump (even if only momentarily) might possibly do "some" good.  Certainly couldn't do much harm for that amount of time.

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Dhil12

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2017, 07:31:33 PM »
no I didn't run the motors, only ran water thru the flushing port with the motors tilted out of the water. I heard that is ok, even from the port office, but wanted to check here if that is correct. I beleive you guys more!
Darrell
2018 Sea Legend ht with bulkhead
2018 Yamaha 200
9.9 yamaha kicker

Offline Dhil12

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2017, 07:33:31 PM »
I'm in a covered moorage slip so can't flush with headphones
Darrell
2018 Sea Legend ht with bulkhead
2018 Yamaha 200
9.9 yamaha kicker

Offline Peddler

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2017, 08:22:00 PM »
My understanding, from
talking to my outboard mechanic, is that flushing with the hose connection is best done when the engine is warm. Like when you return to the dock from a ride. This is what I plan to do next Summer if I follow-they with my plan to moor my boat.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Wishin' I was Fishin'

Offline Dbobby23

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2017, 09:51:36 PM »
My understanding, from
talking to my outboard mechanic, is that flushing with the hose connection is best done when the engine is warm. Like when you return to the dock from a ride. This is what I plan to do next Summer if I follow-they with my plan to moor my boat.





Exactly! The idea would be the thermostat would remain open allowing fresh water to flow in all areas.
I doubt after an hour after running my boat back on the trailer my thermostat would still be open so I  plumbed a hot water hose bib in the garage to flush with and make sure my thermostat will be open. It sounds good in theory who knows if it's actually working.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 10:02:46 PM by Dbobby23 »
1983 seahunter
2004 yamaha f8
2007 yamaha f60 efi

Offline Dbobby23

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2017, 10:01:31 PM »
I went down today and flushed my motors using the water port, since I'm moored. I ran Saltaway for a minute in each with them lifted out of the water. Is that correct? I had water coming out every orifice including the tell tale.

Thanks,
Darrell

I was just at west marine and saw they have a safer saltaway now to use around delicate areas for this reason probably. To many people were using the original saltaway at the dock or marina. I don't know squat what's in the original formula but according to the west marine employee and what threeweight was saying this is not good stuff to put in our waters.
1983 seahunter
2004 yamaha f8
2007 yamaha f60 efi

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2017, 06:40:13 AM »
   No doubt, we have to be environmentally responsible these days.  I use a salt terminator but mix-in a bit of lemon juice with it.  That's right.........I said "lemon juice".  Go ahead and laugh.  My old Honda 45 had only one water pump and thermostat in 22 years of service.  Ever put it in your dishwasher when the minerals get overwhelming?  Cleans the build-up out of absolutely every crevice.  Doesn't take much when mixed with the terminator.....maybe 10% by volume is what I use.

Yat

 
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Markshoreline

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2017, 07:39:58 AM »
When I was moored at Edmonds I used the flush port with the motor up- I think Yamaha recommends 15 minutes of water.
I also bought a flush bag that you fill with water and run the motor in neutral.
2002 Sea Ranger HT 21, Yamaha 150, Yamaha 9.9

Offline Rokefin

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2017, 07:47:30 AM »
When I was moored at Edmonds I used the flush port with the motor up- I think Yamaha recommends 15 minutes of water.
I also bought a flush bag that you fill with water and run the motor in neutral.


15 minutes? I had no idea.  I usually run 5 minutes or so with a warm engine.
1989 17ft Arima Sea Chaser 2010 115 Yamaha 1995 9.9 Yamaha kicker - Bodega mostly

Offline Peddler

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2017, 10:47:02 AM »
When I was moored at Edmonds I used the flush port with the motor up- I think Yamaha recommends 15 minutes of water.
I also bought a flush bag that you fill with water and run the motor in neutral.

Yes, Yamaha manual states 15 minutes for using the hose attachment.  If running on muffs, or other fresh water source, it states "at fast idle for a few minutes."
Wishin' I was Fishin'

Online Threeweight

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2017, 11:21:37 AM »
With the flush port attachment, you are basically just filling up the cooling jacket of the engine and letting the water overflow out the tell tale.  Sort of like filling up your sink and letting it run out the overflow.  My guess is you don't get quite the same flushing action you would from the impeller pushing water through the system, thus the need to let it run longer.

I think my Honda says at least 10 minutes.  Wish my Honda kicker had a flush port... I've heard of guys plumping into the cooling jacket for a combination flush port/hot water source.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2017, 03:26:11 PM »
   Threeweight.......something is still bothering me about this.  I figured you'd be the guy to ask.    Ever since I got this new BF60 Honda with the flush port, I've been wondering if water being introduced through this port is getting to pump; at least to an extent that the motor can be started for a few seconds without doing any damage.  Although I know you have a larger and different model Honda, can you shed any light on this?  Do you have the shop manual for your motor?   If so, does it show the water passages connected to this port, or does it offer any additional information regarding flushing through these ports?  Thanks for your time.


Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Online Threeweight

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2017, 05:08:33 PM »
The port on my 225 is just just a hose that runs to a nipple that is threaded into the engine's cooling jacket (with a check valve in it).  I am sure some water leaks down to the impeller, but I wouldn't want to run the engine that way.  I have the shop manual for my motor, but I've never looked to see what it says in it about the port.  The owners manual says not to run it off the port.

My bigger concern than the impeller is that I don't think the port will push enough water into the engine to cool it when running.  Even with a garden hose with really good water pressure at home, the pee stream when I use the flush port is pretty anemic.
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2017, 05:18:59 PM »
   Interesting you say that about the pee stream.  The stream on mine is very strong when flushing through that port.  Again, there is also quite a bit of water draining from the intake ports on the lower end as well.  This is why I thought there must be enough water in the pump jacket to run it.....even for just a few seconds. 

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Online Threeweight

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2017, 05:25:55 PM »
The port on my 225 is just some 1/4" rubber tubing with an adapter on it to screw onto a hose pipe.  The ports on my old Suzuki 90 were a much better design (it had 2 of them, one midway down the leg of the motor and one up top in the front where the controls/wiring went into the cowling.)
Former Sea Chaser 17 owner
Wild Card, Hewescraft Ocean Pro 220, Honda 225 and 9.9

“Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed.”
       --- Hunter S. Thompson

Offline Markshoreline

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2017, 06:09:53 PM »
Yat I wouldn't run the motor with the flush port unless your mechanic/dealer says it's a good idea.  Yamaha recommends against doing so but I don't know about Hondas.
2002 Sea Ranger HT 21, Yamaha 150, Yamaha 9.9

Offline Croaker Stroker

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2017, 06:22:49 PM »
When flushing through the port on my Etec, the flow appears to backflush through the engine and thermostat.  Because I am forcing water in where it normally comes out ?

Am I seeing this right ?
1987 - 17' Sea Pacer - 2004 Evinrude 90 E-tec
15' Sea Sprinter - **SOLD**

"If a fish will, he will… if he won't, he won't… and that's about it… except… he may take this when he won't take that."

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #22 on: October 06, 2017, 05:09:41 AM »
   Threeweight;  From the way you describe it, looks like I've got the same flush assembly (with the rubber tube) as yours.  Being such, I've also got the feeling the flush water probably follows a similar pattern in these motors.   Both you and Mark seem to be in agreement with respect to not running when flushing on these ports.  Unless I find out otherwise, I'll probably refrain from running it myself.  Thanks to all for the responses.   

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Kimbrey

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #23 on: October 06, 2017, 09:40:35 AM »
   No doubt, we have to be environmentally responsible these days.  I use a salt terminator but mix-in a bit of lemon juice with it.  That's right.........I said "lemon juice".  Go ahead and laugh.  My old Honda 45 had only one water pump and thermostat in 22 years of service.  Ever put it in your dishwasher when the minerals get overwhelming?  Cleans the build-up out of absolutely every crevice.  Doesn't take much when mixed with the terminator.....maybe 10% by volume is what I use.

Yat

 
I've read somewhere where Salt Away and Salt Terminator are on opposite ends of the ph scale.  IE one is alkaline with the other being acidic soooo if correct wouldn't adding lemon juice to the one that is alkaline cancel out its properties??  Lemon juice is great for cleaning ground in dirty hands.
2005 Sea Legend --Sold--replaced with 26' Duckworth

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2017, 11:24:33 AM »
    Kimbrey, I can't speak to the relative PH scale of these two products as I really don't know enough about the relationship between the two. What I do know is, lemon juice works quite well for dissolving mineral deposits.  If you have hard water where you live (containing high levels of minerals),  put it in your dishwasher or in the tank of your toilets and you'll see what I mean.  That's why I mix it with the salt terminator.  Now, I have no baseline from which to accurately measure the results of this on my outboard.......meaning;  one motor rinsed with and one without, over an extended  period of time.   I can, however, tell you that I have never had mineral buildup by using it.  BTW, have you ever had a kidney stone?  If so, perhaps your doctor may have told you to hit the lemon juice.  It's all about "minerals".

   Many years ago, I recall somebody telling me to use vinegar to rinse my outboard.......maybe he was on to something.  Never tried it, but the lemon juice (mixed with the salt terminator) seems to do the trick for me.   

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Danno

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2017, 11:36:18 AM »
Vinegar is acetic acid. Lemon juice is citrus acid. Neither is pH stabilized. I suspect Salt away and Salt Terminator are. Problem is that you want to dissolve the mineral deposits but stop the action otherwise it will continue while the boat is parked. Make sure to do a fresh water rinse afterward if using either acid.

I would tend to agree that adding the acid to the >7 ph Salt Terminator would defeat the purpose or if it's properly stabilized (buffered pH) that it's not helping anything.

Previously owned a 1998 19' SR

Lures are designed to catch fishermen not fish.

Offline Fisherdv

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #26 on: October 06, 2017, 08:37:34 PM »
   Threeweight.......something is still bothering me about this.  I figured you'd be the guy to ask.    Ever since I got this new BF60 Honda with the flush port, I've been wondering if water being introduced through this port is getting to pump; at least to an extent that the motor can be started for a few seconds without doing any damage.  Although I know you have a larger and different model Honda, can you shed any light on this?  Do you have the shop manual for your motor?   If so, does it show the water passages connected to this port, or does it offer any additional information regarding flushing through these ports?  Thanks for your time.


Yat
Yat, I do have the (Honda) shop manual for our motors. I’ll take a look and see.
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP

Offline Yachter Yat

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2017, 05:03:17 AM »
   Fisher, thank you.

Yat
Dear Arima:  Please "square-off" the Hunter transom. Next, stretch the Explorer by 9 and steal 2 or 3 from the cabin.  Please hurry, I'm getting old.

16 SC/Honda 60

Offline Fisherdv

Re: Flushing motors
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2017, 08:58:45 AM »
Yat, the manual shows the flow of water from the water pump up and through the engine. That flow diagram however does NOT show the flush port. The flush port is shown on its own in a separate diagram only showing the flush port components. I will PM you the diagrams cause I don’t know if this forum would allow me to post copyrighted material here. Anyway, why don’t you maybe flush the motor both ways with the flush port and then on muffs also?
2018, Sea Chaser 16, Honda 60HP